Video

howstuffworks:

Fw:Thinking | Tractor Beams Are Real:

They’re just really small right now. Two overlapping Bessel beams can push particles toward a source of light, but when will be able to transport a human?…or a space craft?! In this episode of Fw:Thinking, Jonathan explores the science of Star Trek and the future of tractor beams.

And hey, if you’d like to learn more about real-life (and fictional) tractor beams, the Fw:Thinking podcast team went in-depth on the science behind today’s beams, plus on the fictional history of the tech.

Photo
futurescope:

Stanford’s Artificial Neural Network Is The Biggest Ever
From PopSci:

It’s 6.5 times bigger than the network Google premiered last year, which has learned to recognize YouTube cats.
Last summer, in conjunction with Stanford researchers, Google[x], the R&D arm where ideas like Project Glass are born, built the world’s largest artificial neural network designed to simulate a human brain. Now Andrew Ng, who directs Stanford’s Artificial Intelligence Lab and was involved with Google’s previous neural endeavor, has taken the project a step further. He and his team have created another neural network, more than six times the size of Google’s record-setting achievement. […]

[read more] [picture by joel.geerling via Wikimedia Commons]

futurescope:

Stanford’s Artificial Neural Network Is The Biggest Ever

From PopSci:

It’s 6.5 times bigger than the network Google premiered last year, which has learned to recognize YouTube cats.

Last summer, in conjunction with Stanford researchers, Google[x], the R&D arm where ideas like Project Glass are born, built the world’s largest artificial neural network designed to simulate a human brain. Now Andrew Ng, who directs Stanford’s Artificial Intelligence Lab and was involved with Google’s previous neural endeavor, has taken the project a step further. He and his team have created another neural network, more than six times the size of Google’s record-setting achievement. […]

[read more] [picture by joel.geerling via Wikimedia Commons]

(Source: futurescope, via howstuffworks)

Link

glitterlion:

Cherokee has become the first Native American language fully integrated into Gmail. That means users can now exchange emails and instant message chats entirely in the Cherokee Syllabary, just as they would in English, Spanish or other languages.

Google worked with the The Cherokee Nation and Durbin Feeling - the author of the Cherokee-English Dictionary - to translate hundreds of Gmail terms from English to Cherokee.

“When Google decides to support a language, it’s not just about which ones have the largest number of speakers. In order to do business around the world, we need to support languages with millions of speakers, such as Japanese, French or Arabic,” Craig Cornelius, a Google software engineer, said in a statement. “But we also want to include less spoken languages in order to help preserve the culture and diversity that come with them.”

A 2002 survey of the Oklahoma Cherokee population found that “no one under 40 spoke conversational Cherokee.” The partnership with Google is part of an effort to use technology to encourage a new generation to learn the language.

Software engineer Craig Cornelius explains how this partnership came about on the Gmail Blog:

It was just coincidence that I, a Google engineer working on the internationalization of Google products, ended up carpooling back to San Francisco with Vance Blackfox, member of the Cherokee Nation (CN) from an event we’d both attended. But that coincidence kick-started a collaboration that would result in Google Web Search in Cherokee and, starting today, Gmail in Cherokee.

After a 2002 survey of the Oklahoma Cherokee population found that no one under 40 spoke conversational Cherokee, the Cherokee Nation saw an opportunity to use technology to encourage everyday use of the language among the younger generation. Vance connected me with the language technology department at the Cherokee Nation, and the Gmail team worked closely with their highly organized team of volunteers, which ranged from university students to Durbin Feeling—Cherokee living treasure and author of the Cherokee-English Dictionary. Together, we were able to find and implement the right words for hundreds of Gmail terms, from “inbox” (ᎧᏁᏌᎢᏱ) and “sign in” (ᏕᏣᏙᎥ ᎰᏪᎸᎦ) to “spam” (ᎤᏲᎢ).

Gmail in Cherokee and the Cherokee version of Google Web Search both include a virtual keyboard for typing the syllabary writing system invented by Sequoyah in the early 1800s. Now Cherokee students can easily contact their tribal elders, e.g., “Joseph wants to chat” (“ᏦᏏᏫ ᎤᏚᎵ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ”) and connect instantly. As Joseph Erb, Language Technologist at the Cherokee Nation put it, “Projects like these give more life to our language in our communities. It is not just about preserving our language and culture. It is about using our language each day and every day and continuing who we are as a people. And this give us that chance each time we check our email.”

In 2003, Apple added the font “Plantagenet Cherokee” to its MacOS operating system. In 2010, Cherokee became the first Native language and one of only 40 worldwide languages integrated into the iPhone’s operating system.

Follow link for video.

(via evelark)

Photoset

volatiledesign:

Andrew Myers, artiste of making beautiful paintings on 3 dimmensional objects such as screws, has captured my eye with such a talent. His medium, a simple screw, is drilled into a grid at different depths and painted to create a sculptural painting that is human like in form. Born in Braunschweig Germany, growing up in Spain, and moving to California gave this artist a well rounded and contintental perspective on art and sculpture. His mediums, form and palettes are so very classical but his execution and style speak to a modern person and personify an evolving artist who understands how styles can come together on a unique and touching level.

(via volatiledesign)

Text

Google’s self-driving car gets a thumbs up from the California Senate to be road eligible.

discoverynews:

Not long now…

alexob:

The California Senate unanimously passed a bill favoring autonomous vehicle operation on the roads of the Golden State.

Now the bill has to be approved by the State Assembly, which is expected to give it the green light within the next month, and then eventually head to Governor Jerry Brown’s desk. 

It’s exciting to see how quickly things are moving for autonomous vehicles to become available in light of how regulated transportation is in the US. 

Full report here.

Photoset

howstuffworks:

Is there a way to get solar energy at night?

If you’ve ever bought carbon offsets, you may have noticed that most or all of the purchase price goes toward wind energy, not solar. In the world of large-scale alternative energy, wind reigns supreme, mostly because it’s cheaper. But a recent development in solar-energy production could make solar power a far more viable option.

Check it out.

Photo
howstuffworks:

THIS IS AN EXCITING TIME.
via xkcd

howstuffworks:

THIS IS AN EXCITING TIME.

via xkcd

Text

Diablo 3 gets Metacritic bombed

caramelzappa:

thebitfix:

Oh boy. Here we go again. Thanks to Bizzard’s inclusion of  ”always on” DRM, anyone who wanted to play Diablo III last night logged on to find that the servers were down, and for quite some time too. It seems that even those wanting to get in on some single-player action were not allowed.

One review put it best:

If Blizzard demands that the user have an active online connection. The user should be allowed to demand an active online connection.

I can’t say I disagree. While I might not think review bombing in very classy or mature in any right, it doesn’t stop the fact that if someone buys a game, they should be able to play said game. Especially when that game is $60. The current user review score is a 3.6. So much for GOTY?

Via: Dtoid

DRM, isn’t it a lovely thing? It’s a good think that Blizzard is protecting their customers from playing the game they payed for.

I don’t know if Diablo III has been cracked yet (if not, it will be) but I do know that pirates won’t have to deal with any of this shit.

This is what idiotic DRM does. It punishes paying customers and rewards thieves. How is that anti-piracy?

I’m pretty sure the “always on” DRM is to prevent fraud and shenanigans with the online auction house where people can sell in-game items for irl money.

Still shitty though.