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jeanne-marie:

the-real-goddamazon:

bitteroreo:

the-real-goddamazon:

quietlydepraved:

pixiesteahouse:

princeconstantine:

runningoffthereeses:

well, thats enough internet for today

I need this

Does this come in varying colours, because I want a rainbow of them. 

How ~refined~

I NEED THIS IN THE HOUSE TO SEE IF PEOPLE NOTICE

OMG

IMAGINE HAVING YOUR PARENTS OVER

I WANT THESE SO BAD

I’M JUST IMAGINING MY PARENTS REACTING.

MY DAD WOULD JUST BE MORTIFIED.

"Aisha…"

"Yes, daddy?"

"Aisha are these…?"

"YES."

"I raised you better than this, Aisha."

want

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paulhillier:

A preview of some of the Fan Expo photos that I was looking at. I think I’ll be making a post sometime next week. Until then enjoy the best portal duel cosplay that I’ve seen. Featuring http://poisonne.com/ and Shane
Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | paulhillier.com | Flickr

paulhillier:

A preview of some of the Fan Expo photos that I was looking at. I think I’ll be making a post sometime next week. Until then enjoy the best portal duel cosplay that I’ve seen. Featuring http://poisonne.com/ and Shane

Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | paulhillier.com | Flickr

(via fivesecondmemory)

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lestradeisasilverfox:

Nathan Fillion is not appreciated enough.

(via fivesecondmemory)

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(Source: misterand, via evelark)

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blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

African-American Women Chemists
Jeannette E. Brown
This book profiles the lives of numerous women, ranging from the earliest pioneers up until the late 1960’s when the Civil Rights Acts sparked greater career opportunities. Brown examines each woman’s motivation to pursue chemistry, describes their struggles to obtain an education and their efforts to succeed in a field in which there were few African American men, much less African American women, and details their often quite significant accomplishments. The book looks at chemists in academia, industry, and government, as well as chemical engineers, whose career path is very different from that of the tradition chemist, and it concludes with a chapter on the future of African American women chemists, which will be of interest to all women interested in a career in science.

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

African-American Women Chemists

Jeannette E. Brown

This book profiles the lives of numerous women, ranging from the earliest pioneers up until the late 1960’s when the Civil Rights Acts sparked greater career opportunities. Brown examines each woman’s motivation to pursue chemistry, describes their struggles to obtain an education and their efforts to succeed in a field in which there were few African American men, much less African American women, and details their often quite significant accomplishments. The book looks at chemists in academia, industry, and government, as well as chemical engineers, whose career path is very different from that of the tradition chemist, and it concludes with a chapter on the future of African American women chemists, which will be of interest to all women interested in a career in science.

(Source: guides.libraries.uc.edu, via womenrockscience)

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ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

(via evelark)

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"Be the bigger person"

craftastrophies:

tcharlatan:

lannamichaels:

autie-baeddel-cat:

tcharlatan:

is bullshit advice.

My bigness is not determined by my capacity to quietly absorb bullying, degradation, or abuse.

Yes, this.

I think the truest thing I’ve ever read that addresses this, and it made me cry, was Captain Awkward’s “The Peace Is Already Broken” post.

^^ HOLY SHIT THOUGH ^^

This is so important. Letting it be awkward is a SUPER important skill. It’s really hard for anyone who’s been abused because we’ve been trained to make things nice so we’ll be safe. But it’s important to remember that it’s NOT YOU who is making it awkward. The peace has already been broken. If the other person wasn’t being a dickbag, it wouldn’t be awkward.

Let it be awkward.

(via caramelzappa)

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delusioninabox:

Daily #492! Some days may even be a bit of both.

(via press-x-to-sad)

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supersonicart:

Chun Lo Prints on INPRNT.

Illustrator Chun Lo has prints available for purchase in his INPRNT Store.  You can keep up to date with INPRNT on their Tumblr.

(via caramelzappa)